Dennis Hopper prints to be seen

A collection of more than 400 recently rediscovered prints in which Dennis Hopper documented the U.S. arts scene of the mid-1960s, the civil rights movement and much more is going on show in Berlin — an exhibition that his children say offers an intimate glimpse at his youth.

The black-and-white small-format photos in the exhibition, "Dennis Hopper — The Lost Album," were taken between 1961 and 1967, when Hopper was out of favor in Hollywood and before he directed "Easy Rider," which became a huge and unlikely success.

The prints — some now showing signs of wear — were selected by Hopper himself for an exhibition in Fort Worth in 1970 but later were put into storage and forgotten.

His daughter, Marin Hopper, said that after Hopper died in 2010 and his house was cleared out for sale,the family happened on several boxes containing the prints.

Curators at Berlin's Martin-Gropius-Bau museum, which previewed the show Wednesday, tried to put together the prints, never shown before in Europe, in much the same way they were originally exhibited in 1970.